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Expert Picks

What is your child's learning style?

Allowing your children to access information in terms they are comfortable with will increase their academic confidence. Identifying your children as visual, auditory, or tactile learners, and aligning your overall curriculum with these learning styles, will prove to be beneficial for your lessons.

Visual learners learn better by reading and looking. Auditory learners learn best from lectures, stories, and recordings. Tactile learners learn best from something they can hold in their hands. Take this quick, 20-question quiz and figure out your child’s learning style!


1. What kind of book would they like to read for fun?

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2. When they are not sure how to spell a word, what are they most likely to do?

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3. They're out shopping, and they're waiting in line for you to pay. What is your child most likely to do while they are waiting?

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4. When they see the word "dog," what do they do first?

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5. What's the best way for them to remember things?

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6. What's the best way for them to learn about how something works (like a computer or a video game)?

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7. When they go to school, what do they tell you about the next day?

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8. What do they find most distracting when you are giving them instructions?

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9. When they are angry, what are they most likely to do?

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10. When they are happy, what are they most likely to do?

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11. When in a new place, how do they find their way around?

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12. Of these three classes, which is their favorite?

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13. When they hear a song on the radio, what are they most likely to do?

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14. What do they find most distracting when in class?

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15. What do they like to do to relax?

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16. What is the best way for them to remember a number?

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17. If they won a game, which of these three prizes would they choose?

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18. Which would they rather do with a group of friends?

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19. What are they most likely to remember about new people they meet?

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20. When they give someone directions to their house, what are they most likely to tell them?

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Progress

Auditory

If your child is an auditory learner, they learn by hearing and listening. They understand and remember things they have heard. They store information by the way it sounds, and they have an easier time understanding spoken instructions than written ones. They often learn by reading out loud because they have to hear it or speak it in order to know it.

As an auditory learner, they probably hum or talk to themself or others if they become bored. People may think they are not paying attention, even though they may be hearing and understanding everything being said.

Here are some things that auditory learners like they can do to learn better.

  • Sit where they can hear.
  • Have their hearing checked on a regular basis.
  • Use flashcards to learn new words; read them out loud.
  • Read stories, assignments, or directions out loud.
  • Record themself spelling words and then listen to the recording.
  • Have test questions read to them out loud.
  • Study new material by reading it out loud.

Remember that they need to hear things, not just see things, in order to learn well.


Visual

If your child is a visual learner, they learn by reading or seeing pictures. They understand and remember things by sight. They can picture what they are learning in their head, and they learn best by using methods that are primarily visual. They like to see what they are learning.

As a visual learner, they are usually neat and clean. They often close their eyes to visualize or remember something, and they will find something to watch if they become bored. They may have difficulty with spoken directions and may be easily distracted by sounds. They are attracted to color and to spoken language (like stories) that is rich in imagery.

Here are some things that visual learners like they can do to learn better:

  • Sit near the front of the classroom.
  • Have their eyesight checked on a regular basis.
  • Use flashcards to learn new words.
  • Try to visualize things that they hear or things that are read to they.
  • Write down key words, ideas, or instructions.
  • Draw pictures to help explain new concepts and then explain the pictures.
  • Color code things.
  • Avoid distractions during study times.
  • Remember that they need to see things, not just hear things, to learn well.

Tactile

If your child is a tactile learner, they learn by touching and doing. They understand and remember things through physical movement. They are a "hands-on" learner who prefers to touch, move, build, or draw what they learn, and they tend to learn better when some type of physical activity is involved. They need to be active and take frequent breaks, they often speak with their hands and with gestures, and they may have difficulty sitting still.

As a tactile learner, they like to take things apart and put things together, and they tend to find reasons to tinker or move around when they become bored. They may be very well coordinated and have good athletic ability. They can easily remember things that were done but may have difficulty remembering what they saw or heard in the process. They often communicate by touching, and they appreciate physically expressed forms of encouragement, such as a pat on the back.

Here are some things that tactile learners like they can do to learn better:

  • Participate in activities that involve touching, building, moving, or drawing.
  • Do lots of hands-on activities like completing art projects, taking walks, or acting out stories.
  • It's OK to chew gum, walk around, or rock in a chair while reading or studying.
  • Use flashcards and arrange them in groups to show relationships between ideas.
  • Trace words with their finger to learn spelling (finger spelling).
  • Take frequent breaks during reading or studying periods (frequent, but not long).
  • It's OK to tap a pencil, shake their foot, or hold on to something while learning.
  • Use a computer to reinforce learning through the sense of touch.
  • Remember that they learn best by doing, not just by reading, seeing, or hearing.

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