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Number Sense and Place Value Quiz Game Review
Not Your Mother's Math Class
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PowerPoint quiz games are a great way to review with your class. Topics include: counting, place value, number forms, odd or even & comparing numbers. My class loves playing these game shows!
Product Description

This PowerPoint game is a great way for students to review what they have learned. I like to use these games to review before a test. To play, split your class into groups and have them take turns answering questions. I have played this type of game many times with my students. It is always a big hit. Suggested directions are included but it plays like similar games you have seen. This file is extremely easy to use there are links to each question and answer slide. The point value fades after it has been selected, so you don't need to worry about students picking the same question twice. This can be played on an interactive whiteboard or just with a computer and projected.

The game includes 5 categories:
- Counting
- Place Value
- Number Forms
- Odd or Even
- Comparing Numbers

Each category has 4 questions valued at 100 - 400 points.

This resource was created for use with 2nd Grade Common Core Standards : 2.OA.C.3, 2.NBT.A.1, 2.NBT.A.2, 2.NBT.A.3, and 2.NBT.A.4. Elena Fryer at Not Your Mother’s Math Class is the sole creator of this product and does not claim endorsement or association with the creators of the CCSS standards.

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About the Seller
7 Reviews

I have over 15 years experience working with elementary aged students. My specialty is making math products.

I believe:

  • Math can and should be fun.
  • Learners need lots and lots of practice with manipulatives and hands-on strategies before they can solve abstract problems.
  • We need to let children explore concepts and not force them to memorize formulas to solve problems.
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